From A Proposal Tweet To A Twitter Wedding


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Today I attended a wedding about an hour away in the Ahwatukee Foothills here in Arizona. That’s about an hour away from my office, but I was able to attend in only a couple minutes and I didn’t even get out of my chair.

Love On Twitter

It all started about two years ago when Stephanie Sullivan and Greg Rewis, a couple tweetering geeks in love, made waves with their Twitter marriage proposal and acceptance. He asked her in front of the world and she said yes. Some said it was unromantic, but for a couple who embraces technology with such passion in their careers, it’s not a stretch to imagine such a proposal being even more meaningful than what we’re used to.

The Twitter Wedding

A couple years, and some good press later, on a Thursday evening, Greg and Stephanie had a small ceremony in a back yard as the sun set with about 10 family members and friends in attendance.

Twitter Wedding

Unlike most intimate back yard weddings, though, this one had a hash tag: #tweetwed, vows tweeted as they were being said aloud, and live streaming video of the occasion for anyone interested in joining in on their special day. With about 100 of us watching the video stream on Ustream, and countless others reading tweets and retweets about it, vows were recited and tweeted, geeky web-related jokes were made both by those physically there and remote viewers, leading up to the exchange of rings and the kiss. The whole thing was quick and fun.

What’s Next?

Live-tweeting the event is OK, but the video turned out to be the cooler part. It was just more interactive for a live event and I know we’ll see more and more live-streamed weddings taking place in the future. In fact, my wife will be watching the wedding of a co-worker tomorrow afternoon, streamed live from Las Vegas. There will always be big traditional weddings involving flights and catering, but the future will hold lots of streaming weddings, too and the lowering cost of HD video and bandwidth is only going to make it better.

Panasonic’s VIERA CAST Bag Of Tricks : Skype, Netflix, 3D, And More


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Earlier this year, it seemed that every television manufacturer was announcing a unit with either Skype built in or 3D functionality. Last week, I received an email inviting me to come check out Panasonic’s latest and greatest at their touring presentation that was coming through Scottsdale this week. The draw for me was the 3D, but I found a lot more when I arrived.

3D TVs With Skype

Maybe you’re thinking what I was thinking in the car on the way there… Can 3D stick around this time or is it just going to be hot for a while and die out again? It’s hard to say, but Panasonic is not only betting that 3D is here to stay, but they’re throwing in everything else just in case.

Panasonic 3D HD TVs

One of the VIERA CAST HDTVs I saw today, the VIERA TC-P50G25 Plasma (seen above for $1,499), included the ability to make video calls with Skype (requires an add-on camera), view YouTube videos, browse through photos on Picasa, view and stream movies instantly with Netflix or Amazon Video, and even peruse and update Twitter. To top it off, they threw in a weather screen with forecasts, Pandora radio, Bloomberg, and Fox Sports. You can even browse the web with it, which is probably why you can hook up a keyboard to one of the USB ports. Unfortunately, the demo played from a Blu-Ray disc, so it’s hard to say how the video streaming is and Skype won’t be available for use on VIERA CAST until June of this year. Regardless, it looks very promising. The geek inside me yearns to make a video call on a 50 inch screen without a lot of effort and that is a reality within reach. This model does not do 3D.

The PxxVT25 models, on the other hand, offer 3D and it looks awesome. To be fair, I haven’t seen any other 3D televisions first hand, so my basis for comparison is my 2D LCD and 3D at the movie theaters. That said, this blows my 2D away and makes the movie theater 3D seem a bit lacking. The first demo was with a movie, which looked great, but the real treat was the second demo I saw with some game playing in 3D. It looked incredible and the best part is that the games don’t all have to be made in 3D. There’s software that will make them work in 3D as long as you’re displaying them on one of these 3D TVs.

How To Watch TV In 3D

The televisions mentioned above display a 3D image, but where does that come from and how do you view it? Panasonic tells me they’ll have three channels loaded with 3D programming on DirecTV, and it sounded like 3D programming from other vendors will still work. All that’s left is those paper 3D glasses with the plastic red and blue lenses, right?

Panasonic 3D HD TVs

Not this time. This time, your 3D experience makes use of their special 3D glasses (TY-EW3D10). While I’d like to try the old paper glasses, I’m afraid these are the ones needed to make it work. They’re pretty cool and although the video doesn’t do the experience justice, you can see how they work below.

The problem is that the $150/pair price tag can be prohibitive, especially if you’re thinking about a family of four or five. They’re cheaper than some competitors, but still a bit up there. They definitely look $150 cooler than the old paper 3D glasses, though. I asked if Panasonic planned to bundle family packs of the eye wear and was told that it wasn’t planned yet but could happen as the consumer market accepts 3D more and more.

Cameras and Camcorders

In addition to all this 3D business, the tour included some new cameras of varying levels as well as video cameras. I honestly didn’t spend quite enough time with the video cameras, but it may have been due to all the time spent playing with the DMC-GH1K 12.1 MP digital camera. I’m not about to say I don’t like my Canon Rebel XTi because I love it, but the GH1K was wooing me with features I’ve been missing out on like 1080P HD video, a larger screen that swivels around, Live View, a more compact design, and a more widely used SD storage format (compared to the Compact Flash I use now). At $1499, it is almost twice what I paid for my camera, but still attractive.

Also attractive was the $399 DMC-ZS7K which more than a point-and-shoot, but not quite a DSLR. Every time I thought it had a lot of features I was shown one more. Personally, I’m looking to spend about half that on my next point-and-shoot camera but the feature list is enough to loosen up most any wallet. There’s the basics like auto focus and face targeting, but it also knows the difference between a face and, say, a cactus and adjusts photo settings the moment it makes the distinction. Better still, it can recognize specific faces and remember who it’s taking a photo of and label the photo properly. The 16X Intelligent Zoom was a nice surprise, too. The zoomed image wasn’t pixelated at all until zoomed all the way in and even then, it wasn’t much. Finally, the ZS7K records HD quality video as well, so I could replace my digital camera and my video camera with this one device.

The Touch The Future Tour

What I went to today was called the Touch the Future Tour. Panasonic is wandering around the country with all this cool stuff and showing people what all of it does. If you get a chance, the 3D is best seen in person. They’ll be dragging all their electronics to these cities next:

3/25 – 3/27 Philadelphia King of Prussia Mall – North Gulph Road
3/29 – 3/31 Minneapolis IDS Tower – 80 8th Street South
3/29 – 3/31 San Francisco One Market Plaza – 1 Market Street
3/31 – 4/2 Washington, DC Union Station – 50 Massachusetts Ave, NE
4/6 – 4/8 Dallas Grapevine Mills Mall – 3000 Grapevine Mills Parkway
4/6 – 4/8 Seattle Top of the Market – 93 Pike Street, Suite 307
4/7 – 4/9 Atlanta 595 North – 595 North Ave, NW Atlanta
4/12 – 4/14 Houston The Warehouse – 4108 Dupont Street
4/15 – 4/17 Miami Ice Palace – 59 Northwest 14th Street

Final Thoughts

Panasonic delivered more than I had planned for and showed off some really cool stuff. The new television offerings (3D and otherwise) were certainly giving me TV envy and I just bought a new LCD TV a few months back. The cameras (that I hadn’t really even gone to see) have me formulating evil plans in my head to convince my wife that I have two birthdays this year. I want it all, but would “settle” for any of the 3D TVs and the ZS7K camera.

Organize, Discover And Discuss With Springpad


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This is a Sponsored Post written by me on behalf of Springpad. All opinions are 100% mine.

Yesterday, I came across yet another social media site, but it’s more like a portal or maybe it’s a social media portal.. with apps… and a Digg-like ranking system.

What is Springpad?

Springpadscreenshot

Springpad was built to “help you get things done and share your knowledge”. From an end user view point, it’s a social media portal with built-in applications and data management. Really, though, I think this site becomes what you need depending on how you use it but the same flexibility that makes this site so full-featured also requires a small amount of experimentation if you want to get the most from it.

Features

For the most part, use of the site involves sharing, which is why I call it a social media portal. It utilizes a system in which you add something and people who also like it can “Spring” it up. What makes this site unique is that you enter specific types of items rather than just a link to something. Some things that can be entered are albums, movies, books, products, restaurants, recipes, etc. Anything you add can be locked down as private, left public, or shared via other social media like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, etc. Some other things that can be added that I didn’t expect are lists, tables (data), files, alarms, lists, and coupons. Throw everything in your calendar, add a recipe and then shop from the shopping list it creates for you, or just share thoughts on you favorite restaurant, movie, or wine. Most stuff you’d want to share is covered. The easiest way to add an item if you’re already staring at it on a remote site is to click the Springpad Clipper browser button. If, for example, you happen to be viewing a funny video on YouTube, just hit the Spring It! button and a dialog pops up to allow for the addition of this video to your feed.

Besides collecting, Springpad has many apps to help you plan for the Holidays like a budget tracker, a gift wish-list app, and a party planner. You can also easily keep track of who sent you Christmas cards.

Christmas cards haven’t been all that hard to manage on my own, but the budget tracker, gift wish, and party planner are useful additions.

Open Development

What’s better than full-featured? Open (and easy) development.

Start with the Notebook App. You can add your own tabs & choose what types of items are on each tab. Also, you can add a Filter Box & change between expanded & collapsed views. Just click on the wrench to find most of these settings. Soon, we will allow users to publish their Apps to the public directory – stay tuned!

This is a feature of the site I really want to play around with more as I continue to use the site and explore.

What’s missing

When I signed up, I wasn’t asked for a username. I was able to later change my username from my settings panel, but I think this should be offered up front. The only other concern I had was that this site has so many options that I could imagine it becoming overwhelming if to some people. It is pretty intuitive, but there’s so much to take in. If you get overwhelmed with all the features, just pick one for the day and try the next one tomorrow.

Conclusions

Despite having to spend a little time to learn how some of it worked, I had my Flickr, Twitter, and Facebook accounts dialed in within about a minute and the user experience is about as smooth as can be with this many features. It’s another player in a crowded game, but Springpad brought its fastball and came to play. In my current interaction with the site, it seems like it needs more people playing along, still, to offer the kind of value that convinces people to keep it as their homepage, but I don’t think I’ll have to wait to long to see that happen. Get your free Springpad here.. When you sign up, add me.

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