How Replace A Motorola Droid RAZR Maxx HD XT912 Screen


Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Using a spudger (or guitar pick), carefully release all the clips around the edges. The back is affixed to the phone with double-sided adhesive tape. Carefully pull from each corner and edge until it comes away from the phone.
With the battery revealed, remove the three screws along the bottom , the two on the sides, and two on the top corners with a T4 bit. Beware. There is one more screw under the top plastic cover.
Use a guitar pick or similar pry tool to get underneath the camera panel. Be careful around the rear camera.
Remove the final T3 screw.
Use a guitar pick or similar pry tool to release all the clips around the edge of the bezel. Be careful around the buttons and the sim card slot. I released everything I could on the top, bottom, and around the sim card slot. Then I pried loose the sim card slot and the side with the buttons became much easier.
Using tweezers, remove the battery lead cover shown here. Be careful to not connect the two leads with your tweezers or screwdriver. Remove both T5 screws.
SLowly and carefully pry up the battery. Do not use the pull tab as the batter will be taped down pretty securely. Work your way around the edges of the battery until it feels loose enough to pry up and remove it.
Remove the three T3 screws shown here and remove the battery casing.
After removing the battery frame, remove the yellow tape shown here. Now gently release the three black ribbon clamps as shown. In this photo, the first is released and I am about to release the second.
Using a guitar pick or pry tool, release the four clips that hold the camera housing in place. There are two on the top edge of the phone and one on each side. Once those have been released, use a pry tool under the center of the top edge (even with the screw hole) to pry it up slowly. When loose, carefully pull the camera housing away while unplugging the ribbon cables.
Now remove the cable shield as shown here. In this photo, you can see that I am prying it towards me to release a sticking point. There are cables under here, so be careful and use a safe prying tool!
Once the shield is removed, gently pry up the cable connections as shown. Do all three. The section will be able to raise up a little, but do not pull it out.
Starting in the corners, pry around all the edges of the board. Pry only the edges and be very patient. The board is expensive and you can break it if you’re not careful.
Once you’ve removed the broken screen and bezel, you can now put the new one in place. Don’t forget to attach all three ribbon cables. Be patient and line them up if they don’t connect easily.
Remove the two cameras from the housing and first get the rear-facing camera (on the left) in place and attach its ribbon. Then put the housing in place, and finally add the front facing camera and attach its ribbon cable.
Now put the cable cover back in place the same way you got it out.
Replace the battery housing and secure it with the three screws you removed earlier. Then re-attach the battery cable with the screws the match it.
Now replace the plastic outer bezel and make sure all clips snap into place.
Replace all 7 screws in that hold the bezel and camera housing in place.
Now replace the camera lens and flash cover and the antenna on the bottom.
Finally, replace the back cover and give it a little pressure to get it to stick again and you’re done.
If you’ve done everything correctly, you’ll end up with a working phone and a new screen.

How To Replace A HTC EVO 3D Digitizer


Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

When electronics break or malfunction there are two things you can do if you don’t want to pay for repairs. You can sell it cheap or you can fix it yourself. I like to fix it myself if I think I can, so when I saw an HTC EVO 3D at a garage sale for $10, I had to ask what was wrong with it. The seller told me “the screen acts like you’re touching it sometimes and gets all crazy”, so I bought it with the hope that I could fix it. Sure enough, another $14 and an hour of my time was all it took. Below are the instructions on how to do this yourself. Read them all the way through before starting, click any photo to super size it, and comment below with any questions. Now let’s get started.

1. Buy a new digitizer. Check ebay and you should be able to find one for under $15. The one I bought from etechnotics came with a T5 screwdriver a Phillips screwdriver, and two spudger pry tools.
2. Remove back cover. This is pretty simple to do and likely you’ve done it before.
3. With the cover off, remove battery and MicroSD card.
4. Remove the six screws shown. There are two Phillips screws half way up the phone on the edges, and there are four T5 screws on the corners.
5. Remove the small plastic piece at the top of the phone with a spudger.
6. Remove the back inner housing with a spudger carefully. Be sure not to break anything.
7. With tweezers, remove the three pieces of yellow tape from the connectors.
8. Now disconnect the four flex cables shown. Be careful not to damage them!
9. Remove two silver Phillips screws pointed to in the photo. This will loosen up the board.
10. Flip the piece shown up as you can see in the photo and carefully pull back the board from the top end, being careful about the remaining flex cables that are still connected.
11. Pull back the silver cover tape just enough to reveal these two flex cables and then disconnect them.
12. While you’re at it, unplug the antenna cable.
13. Now for the hard part. Pry the glass away from the screen as shown with a spudger. You can try to loosen the glue with a heat gun or hair dryer, but be very careful about the amount of heat you use as it can damage the components.
14. Pry the screen out of the case in the same way, being mindful of the flex cables. Be very careful here. I nearly damaged the screen being impatient. When complete, you should have three pieces as shown.
15. Clean up any leftover glue between the screen and the digitizer and replace with thin strips of double-sided tape.
16. Peel the backing off of your new digitizer and carefully line it up with the screen, pressing it firmly in place when lined up.
17. Finally, just reverse the steps to put it back together (don’t forget to reconnect ALL the cables).

Smashed And Run Over Blackberry Storm Still Works


Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

I love to tinker and open things up and make them do different things, fixing what’s broken, if I can. In 2008, my wife’s digital camera screen got smashed up and I opened it up and replaced the screen, so when her parents came to stay and brought with them this smashed up Blackberry Storm road kill, asking if I could fix it, I began to think about it seriously.

Blackberry Storm Roadkill

What Happened?

Almost immediately, my father-in-law explained that he was joking and that it wasn’t even his phone. He found it out by the water near his condo back in Michigan. By the looks of it, it had been run over, rained on, stuck in the snow, and run over again. The screen is completely smashed beyond any hope of repair, the back plate won’t even go on anymore, and it almost seems to be held together, ironically, by the screen protector. This phone, clearly, was left for dead and unrepairable.

But It Still Works!

Although the request for repair was a joke, I decided to make it a challenge. While I didn’t want to spend any money on it, I did want to see how much I could get out of this poor little device destined for the trash bin. The first thing I did was pull out the 8GB SanDisk MicroSD card. Thanks to being snugly behind what was left of the back plate, it seemed almost untouched. I was able to easily pull some music files off it. Next, I decided to plug the phone in directly. Not only did it light up, but it connected as a removable storage device and I was able to see all the basic file storage folders, though they were empty. My favorite recovery software, Active Undelete, proved that the storage on this phone had been almost completely unused since purchase. It seemed that the owner of this phone didn’t have it long before tragedy struck.

updating

Finally, I decided to install the Blackberry desktop software and see if I could connect to it to sync. Not only did it connect, but I was able to upgrade the phone’s software and install additional applications. While playing with it, I was able to get it to audibly prompt me for voice commands, which delighted me. This phone, beaten and smashed, seemed to work save for a screen to help make use easier.

Final Thoughts

I admit, I haven’t been a fan of the Blackberry Storm from day one. All I heard from friends who bought one is how annoyed they were with it’s use. After a while, these same Storm owners seemed much more content with it. This experience has given me a new respect for the Storm. I baby my iPhone for fear that a little rough-housing will leave me with a paper weight, so I’m pretty impressed with the durability of the Storm.