TrustR Identifies Smartphone Security Concerns


Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Have you ever gotten a virus or had someone hack your account? With all the private data you store on your computer, it can be a gut-wrenching feeling. Today’s smartphones offer the same worries. Your phone can contain all of your contacts, web browsing history, private messages, photos, videos, and access to lots of online accounts. Luckily, the likelihood of your phone data and access being compromised is minimal, but it’s always better to play it safe. There are several options out there to help you protect your smartphone from potential threats, but the one I am going to review today is called TrustR from Rookie Systems.

Untitled

Identify Smartphone Security Threats

TrustR is an app that scans your device to locate security issues found in other apps. The system that it uses is based on a large database of known security issues and is updated by security professionals daily, according to the developer. The operation couldn’t be easier. After installing the app, you press a giant button (aptly labelled “Press”) and it scans your device, comparing installed versions applications against their central database. From there, it identifies matches in three categories:

Existing Security Problems – These are all the apps that have some level of insecure data or some other issue that may compromise your data or device.

Malicious Apps – These are apps with known malicious behavior such as theft of information or spying built into the app.

Patched Apps – These are apps that had a problem at one point that has since been resolved.

The free version shows the first three threats, and the paid version ($3.99) shows you all threats. After you’ve discovered potential threats, it is up to you to upgrade or remove an app or decide that the threat doesn’t warrant removal or upgrading.

How Well Did It Work?

As mentioned, the app is incredibly easy to use, which is refreshing for a security application. This is because Rookie Systems smartly decided to stick to what’s important.

Untitled
Untitled
Untitled

I was not too surprised to see a few popular apps I use daily had very minor infractions that I’m not worried about. I was a little surprised to find that my PayPal app had a pretty serious man-in-the-middle hole in it several upgrades ago. It’s been fine for a while, but I wonder how long the hole was there before I upgraded.

Although it wasn’t listed as a paid feature, the paid version of TrustR asked for permission to send me push notifications. I agreed, thinking that this would generate a warning when I installed a new app. Sadly, when I removed and then re-installed the WordPress app, there was no notification. I can only imagine, then, that this allows TrustR to periodically alert me if a new threat is added to their database that matches an already installed app. The more I think about it, it would be great if TrustR did both.

Over all, four bucks seems like a jump from free without additional features (other than the unlimited warnings) but it also feels like a good price for piece of mind. Download the free version and list your top three problem apps in the comments below.

This review, although sponsored, contains my honest opinions of the product reviewed.

How To Protect Your iPhone And Computer Online


Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

It happens to the best of us.  You’re cruising along on the Internet when, out of nowhere, you’re suddenly at the mercy of a nasty virus or malware.  Sometimes you’re not even aware right away, leaving your data vulnerable to people you really don’t want having it.  While it may be a growing concern, there are things you can do to prevent that sick, sinking feeling before it’s too late.

Pay Attention To Signs

Sites like Google and Bing are often proactive in guarding your safety online.  They spend millions on the technology to display important warnings like the one seen below when a site is suspected of malicious activity.  They may not be right 100% of the time, but is it really worth the risk when whatever you’re looking for is likely available on a trusted site?

blocked

These generous warnings, however, are also not an excuse to let down your guard.  Always use common sense with anything you encounter online.  If it looks suspicious, think twice before clicking.  This rule applies doubly so when it comes to software found online.  Download from trusted sites and brands whenever possible.

Your Smartphone Is A Computer

It may be small, but that smartphone in your pocket is a computer.  As such, it is susceptible to many of the same issues a desktop or laptop computer can fall victim to.  More concerning is the idea that something so small, that travels with you constantly, can be forgotten or stolen in an instant. That said, it is surprising how many people fail to protect their smartphone, especially when it’s so easy.  The moment I knew it was an option, I downloaded an app on my iPhone that allows me to remotely lock or even completely wipe my iPhone in the event of loss or theft.  Last week, my wife was showing me the similar app she installed on her Android phone.  It’s not hours of entertainment, but it may be the single most important install one day.

Firewalls, Anti-Virus and Andti-Malware Software

It’s hard to buy a PC these days without a pre-configured firewall built in and running right out of the box.  The more advanced viruses, trojans, and malware become, the less you can rely on common sense alone.  I know because I have strict viewing, clicking, and downloading rules to prevent viruses and trojans and one day, I found myself with a trojan anyway.  Not a day has gone by since that I have been without anti-virus software.

Treat Your Computer Like Your Car

Imagine this.  Your close friend asks to borrow your car but you know he has crashed his own car countless times as a result of reckless driving.  Would you hand over the keys?  If you don’t mind the increased risk that you’ll be without the use of a car, go right ahead.  Apply this same thinking to your computer.  If your friend is constantly winding up with malware and trojans on his computer, the odds that he’ll put yours out of commission are certainly increased.  If you have kids, create their own account or accounts, with limited privileges, to help reduce the risk of something bad happening.

Weather you’re a gadget addict like me, or give all your attention to just one device, I’d love to hear your best tip for keeping any or all of your devices protected. Comment below and you’ll be entered to win a $400 Amazon gift card from Kaspersky Lab.

Above, I mentioned software to help keep your computer or smartphone protected.  One way to protect all of your devices is with Kaspersky ONE Universal Security and you can download a FREE trial today.
 
View the Official Sweepstakes Rules for this contest sponsored by  Kaspersky Lab.
This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Kaspersky. The opinions and text are all mine. Official Sweepstakes Rules.If you’re like me, you’re addicted to your smartphone, tablet, maybe even your laptop. What is your best tip for keeping all of your devices secure? Comment below and you’ll be entered to win a $400 Amazon gift card from Kaspersky Lab.
One way to protect all of your devices is with Kaspersky ONE Universal Security. Download your FREE trial today.
This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Kaspersky. The opinions and text are all mine. Official Sweepstakes Rules.
If you’re like me, you’re addicted to your smartphone, tablet, maybe even your laptop. What is your best tip for keeping all of your devices secure? Comment below and you’ll be entered to win a $400 Amazon gift card from Kaspersky Lab.
One way to protect all of your devices is with Kaspersky ONE Universal Security. Download your FREE trial today.
This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Kaspersky. The opinions and text are all mine. Official Sweepstakes Rules.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of KasperskyLab. The opinions and text are all mine. Official Sweepstakes Rules.

How To Remove And Uninstall Antimalware Doctor


Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/sites/jtnew/wp-content/themes/twentysixteen/functions.php on line 2

Yesterday, my wife called to tell me something was wrong with her computer. I told her to shut it off and I’d look when I got home. What I found when I got home was software called Antimalware Doctor reporting fake trojans and slowing down her whole computer. My wife had called because she was immediately suspicious, but so many are easily tricked by software like this that looks credible.

Antimalware Doctor

What Is Antimalware Doctor?

Over the years, the threat of getting a virus or trojan on your computer went from rare to pretty damn scary. The fear of a virus is how software like this works. It disguises itself as legitimate ant-virus software, pretending to help. It will pop up and appear to scan for and then find various threats on your computer. The goal is to make you believe that there is a threat so imminent that you should act right away. I’ve written about scare tactics like this before because they seem to work. You think you have a virus and need to take care of it right away, so you take the suggested action, which leads you to spending money on this horrible software. It’s like finding a burglar in you home, dressed like a cop, and taking him out to dinner to thank him because he says he scared away some burglars.

Antimalware Doctor Removal

Not only does the software pretend to scan and find things, but it is horribly annoying, popping up fake warnings every time you do anything that it thinks might be steps to remove it. Every time I opened the Control Panel, for example, something similar to the image above would appear. Each time, I just used the ALT + F4 key combination to make it go away.

Antimalware Doctor Removal

Programs like this rely on you being stuck with them, so they often do whatever it takes to get installed on your computer and stay there. Usually, you’re enticed into downloading some seemingly harmless software and Antimalware Doctor is bundled with it and installs secretly. Because of this, just uninstalling from your Control Panel will not do the trick. You have to be just as diligent in the removal of this rogue software as the jerks who set it loose on your computer were.

To start, you’ll need to find out where the program is running from. I found its location with the following steps:
1. Press the CTRL, ALT, and DELETE keys at the same time. Then View the Task Manager.
2. In the Task Manager, click the Applications tab and find the Antimalware Doctor application.
3. Right-click on the Antimalware Doctor application in the list and click “Go to Porcess”
4. In the process list, right-click on the process (it should be highlighted) and click “Open File Location”

In the folder with it were two additional files, enemies-names.txt and local.ini. enemies-names.txt contained a list of “offending” software and cookie threats and local.ini contained a bunch of program settings.

Most malware will have another background process that watches for anything trying to remove it. Usually, if you remove the malware executable, it will revive the file from another location immediately. To fool this logic, I opened it in Notepad++ and simply changed the binary contents so that the executable name and location would remain in tact while breaking the program. To do this, I simply added a bunch of random characters a couple lines into the file. In our case, the file was db70virstup.exe. I was not able to save the file until I closed the running process, so I closed it and then saved the file quickly.

Antimalware Doctor Removal

The program also sets up some registry keys. You can really mess up your computer if you change the wrong stuff in your registry, but if you’re careful and know what you’re editing, you should be OK. To view and edit registry keys, go to the Start menu and type “regedit” in the search field and hit ENTER. Once in the registry editor, head to HKEY_CURRENT_USER -> Software -> Antimalware Doctor Inc -> Antimalware Doctor. There, you can see all the registry keys it added, but you really want to just delete the whole HKEY_CURRENT_USER -> Software -> Antimalware Doctor Inc tree.

After removing the registry keys, just delete the folder that the files were found in and you should be all set.

Additional Information

The steps taken above worked for me, but they may not completely remove the software from your computer. Other guides like the one from wiki-security.com have different methods of detection and removal and sometimes even list additional files and/or registry keys to remove.

I don’t remove software threats for a living, nor do I edit my registry often. Any steps listed above are taken at you own risk.

If I missed something or you have questions, just use the comment form below and I’ll be sure to respond.